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Book Review: Tade Thompson’s Rosewater

Book Review: Tade Thompson’s Rosewater

If the events and characters are the weft, giving color and pattern to this narrative, Nigerian life and Yoruba custom are the warp that gives it structure. … Through his words I tasted and smelt the suya Kaaro eats at a roadside stand, felt the heat from the smoldering remains of reanimated bodies “restored” by the dome, and sprinted down a dusty road from a killer robot.

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Book Review: Echo Brown’s Black Girl Unlimited

Black Girl Unlimited contains multitudes. It explores queerness, addiction, abuse, generational trauma, and sexism. It depicts the ways we can grow apart — from others, from ourselves — and how we can grow together. It proclaims that there is no perfect ending: we may lose something essential but learn to live without it, or we may be born whole into a world that does not want us to be. Echo Brown takes us on a journey through a community that, like the sidewalks that line it, are full of cracks where life yet thrives.

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Book Review: Tracy K. Smith’s Life on Mars

Book Review: Tracy K. Smith’s Life on Mars

A collection of poetry as wide-ranging as the cosmos, Life on Mars is a thoughtful exploration of space, death, and the complexities of existence. … The overarching experience of the collection is that of floating through the vacuum of space, contemplating life on Earth while watching the planet turn somewhere high above or far below.

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Book Review: Akwaeke Emezi’s Pet

by making the person who turns out to be a monster recognizable to someone who knows what a monster can look like, Akwaeke Emezi sets the story up perfectly to emphasize that children must be taught about monsters and not blindly shielded from them. That even the most unpleasant atrocities of history must be made known in order to not repeat them.

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